Silver Blade’s Fiction Editor

Alvin Burstein is a Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and a former member of the faculty at the New Orleans-Birmingham Psychoanalytic Center. He writes a monthly movie review for The Psychology Times, A Shrink At The Flics. He has been on the staff of Silver Blade for a few years, and we have benefited greatly from his presence.

Please enjoy his choices of talented writers for our Fall 2018 issue:

Introduction to Silver Blade Poetry Issue 40

First, I want to recognize the nominees for a couple prestigious awards:

2018 Puschcart Prize
“Latch Lock & Chain” Marge Simon Issue 37: Feb 2018
“The Light in the Window” Marge Simon Issue 38: May 2018
“The Valley of Dry Bones” Corrine De Winter Issue 38: May 2018
“Perseids” Ann Thornfield-Long Issue 39: Aug 2018
“I had once built a birdhouse” Nikhita Kokkirala Issue 39: Aug 2018
“For The Man That Makes Me Smoke” Aleczandria Yeager Issue 40: Nov 2018

2018 Best of the Net

“Settling on Mars” by Marge Simon Issue 35: Aug 2017
“You lean into this tree as if its roots” by Simon Perchik Issue 35: Aug 2017
“Robot Motivation” by Ken Poyner Issue 37: Feb 2018
“Howl” by Ann Thornfield-Long Issue 37: Feb 2018
“Oumuamua” by Lauren McBride Issue 37: Feb 2018
“The Book of Eve” by Corrine De Winter Issue 38: May 2018

Second, please enjoy another group of talented poets for the November 2018 issue (40) over the Thanksgiving holidays:

Tomorrow the Scarecrow” by Paul Sherman
For The Man That Makes Me Smoke” by Alecz Yeager
Dark Dragons” by Christina Sng
Edge” by F. J. Bergmann
To Io” by Mindy Watson
Escape from Zero” by Vanessa Kittle
Singer” by Mickey Kulp

Introduction to Silver Blade Issue 37

First, I want to congratulate all the Silver Blade poets of 2017, but in particular, these three Pushcart nominees (in order of poem’s appearance):

Second, this issue’s work is a remarkable way to start the new year with the following ecclectic mix of speculative poetry following some kind of loose arc:

 

Please enjoy (and look for the amended submission guidelines before the end of March 2018 before your next submission)!

 

— John C. Mannone

Introduction to Silver Blade Issue 32 Poetry

We are proud of the line up in this issue:

Michael (Mickey) Kulp (Snellville, GA), How It All Started
Adele Gardner (Newport News, VA), Well, Water, Stars
Rebecca Buchanan (Asheville, NC), i carry the light of a dead star in my pocket
John Reinhart (Wheat Ridge, CO), Arson With a Smile
Wendy S. Delmater (Lexington, SC) & Margrét Helgadóttir (Oslo, Norway), Ithildin
Marge Simon (Ocala, FL), George Tecumseh Sherman’s Ghosts
Ken Poyner (Norfolk, VA), Dave’s Strip Club
Bruce Boston  (Ocala, FL), A Grand Guignol Kind of Night
Chengyu Liu (San Diego, CA), A Nuclear Winter

Many poems have stellar allusions, whether the stars are in the edge of creation, in a bowl, in a pocket, in a well or in the eye of a cat. The series begins with creation and ends with destruction, but there is interesting life in between. Image information is included in the Editor’s Notes at the end of each poem. Please enjoy.

John C. Mannone

Poetry Editor

Introduction to Silver Blade Poetry Issue 31

John C. Mannone

John C. Mannone

This exciting issue is filled with delightful and unusual work from Kimberly L. Becker (NC), Sue B. Walker (Mobile, AL), Deborah L. Davitt (Houston, TX), Lauren McBride (Baytown, TX), John Sexton (Carks, Kenmare, County Kerry, Republic of Ireland), Rohinton Daruwala (Pune, India), Celeste Helene Schantz (Fairport, NY), and Ann Thornfield-Long (Norris, TN).

In lieu of speculative poetry in translation, this issue opens with a poem containing phrases in the Cherokee language, which Becker sings in her recording.

There are several unusual narrative poems in this issue, many of which tell some kind of love story. Alabama State Poet Laureate Emerita, Sue B. Walker deftly handles her experimental poems that at the very least subvert the prose form while lifting it into poetry. The internationally recognized poet from Ireland, John Sexton presents an imaginative narrative flash poem. Deborah Davitt uses a sestina with decasyllabic lineation to tell the story of space exploration and of the need for the human heart. Ann Thornfield-Long speaks of love even in the face of catastrophe. The well-defined structure of the poem is a form of mockery to the chaos of destruction.

I could go one and on about these and the other poems by gifted poets: the punch of the short poems, the surreal nature in others, the craft of sound in yet others/their apocalyptic tones, but I want to be quiet for a moment and let you get to them. There are some comments at the end of each poem and about the images I had chosen to complement the poems. Please enjoy.

 

John C. Mannone

Poetry Editor

 

Morning Song — Kimberly L. Becker (NC)
The Faltering — Sue B. Walker (Mobile, AL)
Cuckoo — Sue B. Walker (Mobile, AL)
Persephone — Deborah L. Davitt (Houston, TX)
stationed on a gas giant — Lauren McBride (Baytown, TX)
The Poem from the Future — John Sexton (Carks, Kenmare, County Kerry, Republic of Ireland)
Thirsty — Rohinton Daruwala (Pune, India)
In the Museum of Lost Sounds — Celeste Helene Schantz (Fairport, NY)
et in Arcadia ego — Celeste Helene Schantz (Fairport, NY)
Love in the Time of Apocalypse — Ann Thornfield-Long (Norris, TN)
The Raven Mockers — Kimberly L. Becker (NC)

Introduction to Silver Blade Poetry Issue 30

by John C. Mannone

johnm1Welcome to Issue 30 of Silver Blade. One thing you will notice is the wide variety of voices and styles of presentation, let alone speculative texture. At the last minute, we lost a couple poems that provided better bridges for the rest of the collection, but you will not be disappointed with this unusual collage of poetry. The complementary artwork was found using the Advance Google Image search. Images might have been enhanced and/or combined with simple applications (PowerPoint, iPhoto, Word).

We open with Margaret Wack’s dark post apocalyptic poem, “Conflagration,” and quickly move into Mary Soon Lee’s poem rendered as a 2-minute play, “First Lesson.” Ash Krafton’s poem may have physics and astronomy flavors, but the physical is transcended to the metaphysical in “Temporally Illuminate.” This segues nicely into John W. Sexton’s well-crafted “Seeming Space.” And this is followed by yet more astronomy-based scifi work of John Philip Johnson, “Lesser Lunar Geese.” Wendy S. Delmater’s “fan fiction” fantasy poem, “Fëanor,” is based on J. R. R. Tolkien’s character. Finally, in the spirit of a speculative poem in translation, Ef Deal translates this poem into French.

John C. Mannone